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Someone help me understand

Feb 03, 2017 at 08:52 AM CST
+ 7 - 1
Some of the fertilizer loads out of Catoosa are paying as low as $1.34 per mile. And carriers are taking them.
I am sorry but that is just stupid. I guess it's a monkey see monkey do business.
The carriers are the only people who can end this business of cut throats rates.
If you are pulling one of those cheap loads you deserve to spin a rod bearing. See if a mechanic will fix your engine for a rate similar to what you hauled that load for.

Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 09:30 AM CST
+ 2 - 7
I'm have to disagree with you. Keep in mind that the rate is dictated by the market. We are not in the same financial position we were some years ago. The game has changed, and we are all trying to adjust the best that we can. Wishing ill on a carrier that is trying to hustle, certainly won't solve the problem you are having with the rates.
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 12:17 PM CST
+ 4
David I have to agree with you! Scott I have to disagree with you! Just my take, hauling loads @ $1.35/pm or less is not "trying to hustle" IT IS THE PROBLEM!
The first owner/driver/dispatcher that takes a load to move their truck, for what ever reason , below the (real) cost of operating that truck, is hurting all of use trying to pull hoppers for a living. Everyones cost is different. Yes,I agree. NO ONE CAN RUN AT $1.35/pm and last for long, so why do it at all? I need to get home fuel money. Drive home, don't wait in line to load and unload. Why pull 25 tons or more for fuel money? There is alot more to consider beyond fuel cost. Well I've got a good load that I pulled from the north, so I can afford to take this cheep load back. REALLY, take the profit from the 1st load and use it to justify taking the loss on the cheep load. I would like to do more at a profit and less HUSTLING. Would anyone be surprised if (ALL OF US) set $2.00/pm at our will not pull for less rate, not one of these cheep load would sit for very long. Just saying.May GOD bless each and all!
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 12:39 PM CST
+ 2
Scott I don't pray anyone has misfortune. I simply want people to think about what they are doing when they provide there valuable service at below standard rates, other segments of this industry won't be so gracious.
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 01:04 PM CST
+ 1 - 2
I certainly understand both sides of this debate. I come at it from the perspective of a Broker. Believe me when I say that I would like nothing more than to pay every run what it deserves. The fact of the matter is, that in a lot of cases the money I have to spend doesn't do any justice to the load itself, or the carrier for that matter. Every day I get loads to move with rates that are way below where I would like to see them. This is a market issue, and has nothing to do with me personally. It's my job to do my best to move the loads as they come in, with whatever rate provided. Would I like to see more favorable rates for my carriers? Of course I would, I have a tremendous amount of respect for everyone that runs a load for me. The simple truth is, I don't always get the kind of money I need to provide a quality experience for either of us. I sincerely appreciate all of the difficult work that is involved with hauling freight around this country on a daily basis! In the end, I think we are all just victims of circumstance, and adjustments need to be made on both sides.
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 01:50 PM CST
Scott,
How long would those loads sit if, NO ONE, would take them @ $1.35?

Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 01:54 PM CST
They would sit forever i'm afraid.
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 02:01 PM CST
+ 1 - 3
But then I would lose my job. So I would go home and take it out on my wife, who in turn would breakdown, and lose her job! Forcing us to move in with one of our children, and that stress would be too much for them, and they would in turn lose their job. We would then have to sell the dogs for money to eat, and they would most likely take it out on their new owners, which of course would cause them to lose their job.. See what's happening here? Half of something is still half. Half of nothing means I have to sell my dogs.
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 02:51 PM CST
Scott? FOREVER???---Half of the places we haul to are using our trucks to warehouse the products they need to run that day. Ask the drivers how many times they have been pulled out of line to be unloaded because the plant needed what they were hauling, or how many times other trucks have been pulled infront of them because they needed what he had on?
Have you seen the size of some of the storage the dairy or co-ops have on hand. 1 maybe 2 weeks of trucks not running and all would come to a hault. two days of bad weather can cause suspension of HOS rules for some drivers, and the list goes on and on.
I'm just wodering at what rate would you just say " I can't post that. That is just wrong."?
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 03:18 PM CST
+ 1
Originally Posted by: DAVID WARREN
Quote: "Scott? FOREVER???---Half of the places we haul to are using our trucks to warehouse the products they need to run that day. Ask the drivers how many times they have been pulled out of line to be unloaded because the plant needed what they were hauling, or how many times other trucks have been pulled infront of them because they needed what he had on? Have you seen the size of some of the storage the dairy or co-ops have on hand. 1 maybe 2 weeks of trucks not running and all would come to a hault. two days of bad weather can cause suspension of HOS rules for some drivers, and the list goes on and on. I'm just wodering at what rate would you just say " I can't post that. That is just wrong."?"

Scott , I have been in the trucking world for 35 plus years , and it was a lot hard to get loads and find truck with OUT the innet and computers to DO your thinking , for you , and I will not post a load i wouldnt but my truck on , You can always find some less then good paying loads from some cheap shipper if you are in a spot you need your truck to, So take it from a old fart , its easier to work on some find shipper that will pay a good rate and kept them happy with good service , so you can kept that work
Scott good luck sellling your dog
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 03:26 PM CST
+ 1 - 2
If I had a choice in this matter, things would be completely different, believe me. However, in order to support my family, I have to work. And one of my primary responsibilities is to book the loads they give me. I'd like to think that I'm quite compasionate when it comes to my carriers well being, and overall fairness. Having said that, I appreciate the conversation, and concern for my dog.
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 03:48 PM CST
Brokers are THE only ones making money
the person with the least expense and the owner
operator makes least with all the expense
i wish shippers would deal with the carriers and leave
out the greedy brokerage co. It's a middle that killing
the industry !
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 03:50 PM CST
+ 1
Originally Posted by: SCOTT SKOKAN
Quote: "If I had a choice in this matter, things would be completely different, believe me. However, in order to support my family, I have to work. And one of my primary responsibilities is to book the loads they give me. I'd like to think that I'm quite compasionate when it comes to my carriers well being, and overall fairness. Having said that, I appreciate the conversation, and concern for my dog."

Do you ever tell your customer that it is to cheap and that they are wanting their product moved at a loss to the carrier? Do you just say ok to the cheap rate of said customer, take your cut at what I would assume that is still make you a profit, and throw it out at a cheap rate and hope for someone that will haul it? You as a broker taking cheap freight is just as bad as a carrier taking cheap freight.
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 03:55 PM CST
- 2
I tell my Customer Service team, who then tell our Sales team, who then tell our Operations Staff, who eventually speak with the President. Look, we all know that rates are down, but the freight never stops. I'm but 1 of 50 brokers here, and all of us have someone to answer to. And without a paycheck, that person is my wife!! :)
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 07:38 PM CST
Catoosa is a lose lose situation for all carriers. Deal is those rates will never rise because if no one hauls them, they get put on a train north. They are trying to get as much as possible moved cheap before the trains take over.
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 08:00 PM CST
+ 2 - 1
Originally Posted by: DAVID HAYES
Quote: "Do you ever tell your customer that it is to cheap and that they are wanting their product moved at a loss to the carrier? Do you just say ok to the cheap rate of said customer, take your cut at what I would assume that is still make you a profit, and throw it out at a cheap rate and hope for someone that will haul it? You as a broker taking cheap freight is just as bad as a carrier taking cheap freight. "

He just says ok. He don't care how cheap it is. He has somebody to answer to that obviously does not care either. Simple answer just don't pull the crap. Let them load it in their own trailers and haul it themselves.
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 11:22 PM CST
Originally Posted by: SCOTT SKOKAN
Quote: "They would sit forever i'm afraid."

Let them sit,
Replied on Fri, Feb 03, 2017 at 11:39 PM CST
Originally Posted by: JAMES THOMAS
Quote: "Brokers are THE only ones making money the person with the least expense and the owner operator makes least with all the expense i wish shippers would deal with the carriers and leave out the greedy brokerage co. It's a middle that killing the industry !"

It's not exactly the brokers, 1 trucker told me, who is not trucking now! Said he took a flat bed load from Los Angeles CA to FL for $875 because he had to go, i know that's not the brokers bad.
Replied on Sat, Feb 04, 2017 at 12:25 AM CST
- 1
Originally Posted by: SCOTT SKOKAN
Quote: "But then I would lose my job. So I would go home and take it out on my wife, who in turn would breakdown, and lose her job! Forcing us to move in with one of our children, and that stress would be too much for them, and they would in turn lose their job. We would then have to sell the dogs for money to eat, and they would most likely take it out on their new owners, which of course would cause them to lose their job.. See what's happening here? Half of something is still half. Half of nothing means I have to sell my dogs."

I hope your kidding, if your loads or pay check dont pay, take a 2nd job, learn a new skill, for truck drivers if you have a tanker, hazmat endorsement on your license with a Twic card companies will pay you good, I've heard it's better than being an owner operator with today's rate per mile, Good Luck.
Replied on Sat, Feb 04, 2017 at 03:19 AM CST
I like how everyone just glossed over the rail point he made. The opportunity is there for a carrier that wants it. If not, it goes by rail when it needs to go.

i guess I don't understand the butt hurt over it. There are products that I pull for customers that can either go bulk, or in totes. Totes cost more but vans are cheaper in certain lanes than a hopper. At a certain price, one option becomes better than the other. I'll post a load bulk and dry van, take calls from a hopper carrier who complains about the rate and I simply have to say, any higher than this and the van prices become the cheaper option to the customer. So in that situation I should cost my customer more money to pay a hopper a dollar or two more per ton to keep him happy??? If anyone here for a second thinks that in that situation I should put my supplier's interest ahead of my customer's is truly not thinking, but being emotional in their rational. Not to mention the fact that if there are carriers willing to do it at a lower price but I choose to overpay a truck, I risk losing the account to another broker or carrier.

the thing people forget is that bulk trailers are not only competing with each other, but with van, rail, and even barge freight prices.

Also, 80% of carriers suck at negotiating.
Replied on Sat, Feb 04, 2017 at 07:04 AM CST
It can be a shitty business. Cost has little to do with the rates. For the carrier or the broker. It is supply and demand. When no one is available to haul it the rate will go up. The trucks have moved to "greener grass" or they are broke. Thinning the herd. When there is a "wind fall opportunity" , meaning very good rates, do you offer to do it for less?
Replied on Sat, Feb 04, 2017 at 07:42 AM CST
At a 1.35 a mile, eventually you will loose your job or life. We all know that loads have to pay above 2.00 pm for profit. Shame on the government for not regulating some that should be regulated so we don't have to drive 18 hours a day to make small profit margins while scumbag brokers keep a lot of the loads profit.
Replied on Sat, Feb 04, 2017 at 10:27 AM CST
Originally Posted by: SCOTT SKOKAN
Quote: "I'm have to disagree with you. Keep in mind that the rate is dictated by the market. We are not in the same financial position we were some years ago. The game has changed, and we are all trying to adjust the best that we can. Wishing ill on a carrier that is trying to hustle, certainly won't solve the problem you are having with the rates."

I don't get it that is bs. What dictates the rates are what you can get a carrier to haul it for. If a shipper has x number of loads and they sit because its too cheap to move the rate goes up to get the product hauled. Rail doesn't deal with cheap rates you pay what they charge to move it. If carriers would stop hauling this 1.34 a mile crap it would go away. These shippers aren't gonna let there product sit. We own the trucks we should control the rates not the underbidding brokers trying to get the haul. If these brokers would have to haul this stuff themselves if they can't get the trucks it would change.
Replied on Sat, Feb 04, 2017 at 11:34 AM CST
Originally Posted by: SHANE ROSE
Quote: "I don't get it that is bs. What dictates the rates are what you can get a carrier to haul it for. If a shipper has x number of loads and they sit because its too cheap to move the rate goes up to get the product hauled. Rail doesn't deal with cheap rates you pay what they charge to move it. If carriers would stop hauling this 1.34 a mile crap it would go away. These shippers aren't gonna let there product sit. We own the trucks we should control the rates not the underbidding brokers trying to get the haul. If these brokers would have to haul this stuff themselves if they can't get the trucks it would change."

He is just spitting out the same old BS that a lit believe. The amount you move a truck for did not change because the widgets market sucks. Matter of fact the price to move the truck actually should go up when there are fewer loads. My prices went up instead if down over the last two years. I just did fewer loads.
Replied on Sat, Feb 04, 2017 at 01:20 PM CST
+ 1
This discussion has been great so far!!! Scott I am sorry about your dogs:(( no I'm not I am concerned with keeping my wife and kids fed clothed and what not.
I would like to add another aspect to this discussion. Does the quality of service matter anymore? What about safety ratings, timelines of delivery, the ability to communicate with broker shipper, reciver, equipment that is in condition to transport commodities without damage, " no holes in tarp" having a good understanding of load to load contamination?
Does any of that mater? If not we should all drive white trucks with a black stripe and call ourselves generic carriers.
Replied on Sat, Feb 04, 2017 at 02:50 PM CST
Originally Posted by: DAVID LEHMAN
Quote: "This discussion has been great so far!!! Scott I am sorry about your dogs:(( no I'm not I am concerned with keeping my wife and kids fed clothed and what not. I would like to add another aspect to this discussion. Does the quality of service matter anymore? What about safety ratings, timelines of delivery, the ability to communicate with broker shipper, reciver, equipment that is in condition to transport commodities without damage, " no holes in tarp" having a good understanding of load to load contamination? Does any of that mater? If not we should all drive white trucks with a black stripe and call ourselves generic carriers."

Service? What is that? I hear that a lot but nobody really cares anymore. It is all about the cheapest price. You get what you pay for. If you want fast food prices then you will get the fast good quality of service. I for one don't give a shit about his dogs nor his wife. That is not my problem. As far as the stripe deal instead of thinking we are all generic reverse your color scheme and you will have it nuts on. We as an industry by and large lack integrity so we resemble the skunk in looks and smell.
Replied on Sat, Feb 04, 2017 at 08:36 PM CST
Originally Posted by: SCOTT SKOKAN
Quote: "I tell my Customer Service team, who then tell our Sales team, who then tell our Operations Staff, who eventually speak with the President. Look, we all know that rates are down, but the freight never stops. I'm but 1 of 50 brokers here, and all of us have someone to answer to. And without a paycheck, that person is my wife!! :)"

That's like play the kids game when we used to sit in a cirle and tell the story to the next person and by the time it gets back around to the starting line it is a totally different story.

So you as a broker have no direct contact with said customer?

Guess what my friend, when my bosses run the miles vs my gross that number had better be at my target or better (Alfred - that includes my profit margin) or I have someone to answer to. I can tell you with out a doubt that $1.34 a loaded miles isn't even in the parking lot of the ball park.

The north bound out of the Tulsa area is in the 3 to 4 dollars a ton less than it was a couple of years ago and even then it was on the cheap side.
Replied on Sun, Feb 05, 2017 at 02:22 PM CST
Originally Posted by: BRENNEN BIRD
Quote: "Catoosa is a lose lose situation for all carriers. Deal is those rates will never rise because if no one hauls them, they get put on a train north. They are trying to get as much as possible moved cheap before the trains take over."

Let the trains move it north! I get better money hauling from the local terminals to my customers than they get hauling out of catoosa. I get 12-14 a ton to haul 60-80 miles and can get 3 loads a day. Well over the crap rate coming out of Oklahoma. I can make over $1000 a day for under 500 miles, half of which are empty, or go to Oklahoma and drive over 1100 miles for under $1000 for atleast a day and a half of work.
Replied on Sun, Feb 05, 2017 at 05:52 PM CST
+ 1
heres a thought from a one truck/one driver guy. My competetion down the road has 15 trucks,and is always looking for drivers.He has to keep his trucks moving no matter what the rate, so guess what? He has to lo-ball rates to keep his drivers working, figuring a few bucks times 15 trucks will suffice. I end up staying home a lot rather than pulling cheap,I really feel for the folks out there with big truck payments,etc, etc
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 12:12 AM CST
I'll say this... and I don't mean any harm to ANYONE... but some of these brokers/agents are just getting more and more ridiculous by the day.. I'm seeing the $1.60 a mile loads too... and now they believe that $2.00 a mile is the magical number. I've had a few loads over the last feww weeks that the brokers post and they say 'GOOD PAYING'.. when you call it's either right at $2.00 a mile or a little more... and I want ALL the brokers to read this part.... STOP THINKING $2.00 a mile for FERTILIZER loads are GOOD RATES!!! After you empty you've got to find a washout location, that is normally never close by and then pay for that.... and then alot of shippers won't load you after a FERTILIZER load... Trucking is just getting sad...
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 06:43 AM CST
Originally Posted by: DAVID LEHMAN
Quote: "Scott I don't pray anyone has misfortune. I simply want people to think about what they are doing when they provide there valuable service at below standard rates, other segments of this industry won't be so gracious."

The shipper and broker needs to admit(they already know) that hoppers & dumps are specialized equipment. That gets paid more than a van. Scott if a load can go either van or bulk , put it on the van. The other point I want to make is this ,I have said this for decades you can put 25 naked girls & 25 naked truckers lock them in a room & the truckers will do each other other before they do the girls.
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 07:39 AM CST
Originally Posted by: DANIEL MCELWAIN
Quote: "The shipper and broker needs to admit(they already know) that hoppers & dumps are specialized equipment. That gets paid more than a van. Scott if a load can go either van or bulk , put it on the van. The other point I want to make is this ,I have said this for decades you can put 25 naked girls & 25 naked truckers lock them in a room & the truckers will do each other other before they do the girls."

I would not consider a hopper specialized. An end dump or a pneumatic, walking floor is specialized. Some trailer specialties command a higher premium than others.

Basically the same as a flatbed world with a flatbed, stepdeck, low boy.

I know that if I need a Pneumatic I'll be paying a premium, but if a Pneumatic calls for a load that will work on a hopper, then he is getting the hopper rate.
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 09:12 AM CST
If you want to go broke fast, haul grain anywhere or Fertilizer out of Inola or Catoosa. The brokers and fert guys are all figuring rates on a backhaul. They figure you will have a good paying load going down, let's say Frac sand at 2.12 a mile so when you haul the cheap Fertilizer north you will average in that $1.50 to 1.60 range. I tell them backhaul is a dirty word.

We have a good broker that we trust and have told them only runs with 1.60 minimum and they do a good job of finding those loads. We go over the money before we even take the load on. The Ag sector will wear out your equipment and you if you let them. You gotta work smart.........which we have not always done. Marcus


Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 09:41 AM CST
This thread started out as help me understand here goes. Everybody can own or pull a van but not everybody has a hopper or a dump.a van can haul anything,a hopper or dump Is designed to haul only certain things. You can not haul canned green beans on a hopper but you can on a van so on and so on. this is the bull that the shippers and brokers try to give us. small truck Co. and owner ops must wake up to this truth. still don't believe me come to Baltimore Md agsource unloads imported grain out of container vans and loads same trailers with export grain. try loading or unloading a van load (canned green beans)on a hopper. what else can I say.
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 11:05 AM CST
This thread started out as help me understand here goes. Everybody can own or pull a van but not everybody has a hopper or a dump.a van can haul anything,a hopper or dump Is designed to haul only certain things. You can not haul canned green beans on a hopper but you can on a van so on and so on. this is the bull that the shippers and brokers try to give us. small truck Co. and owner ops must wake up to this truth. still don't believe me come to Baltimore Md agsource unloads imported grain out of container vans and loads same trailers with export grain. try loading or unloading a van load (canned green beans)on a hopper. My point is if you want a load delivered on a self unloading trailer pay up this is specialized.
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 04:20 PM CST
Originally Posted by: DANIEL MCELWAIN
Quote: "This thread started out as help me understand here goes. Everybody can own or pull a van but not everybody has a hopper or a dump.a van can haul anything,a hopper or dump Is designed to haul only certain things. You can not haul canned green beans on a hopper but you can on a van so on and so on. this is the bull that the shippers and brokers try to give us. small truck Co. and owner ops must wake up to this truth. still don't believe me come to Baltimore Md agsource unloads imported grain out of container vans and loads same trailers with export grain. try loading or unloading a van load (canned green beans)on a hopper. what else can I say."

For those who would lump ANY BULK HAULER in the same category as a van or reefer is ludicrus. Come with me and let me see you unload that van or reefer on an 18 inch wide conveyor sitting on a rail spur, or lets get you loaded at the same spot. Hell pull into Saginaw and get in a 100 truck line and unload your wheat there.

With all due to respect, that logic is illogical.
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 04:27 PM CST
Comparing the 2 is apples and oranges.

I know plenty of grocery facilities out east that have vans sit for 8, 10, 12 hours even. They're famous for that crap. Each mode has its own risks associated with it.

The reason I like brokering hoppers? Way fewer claims. If there's a hopper claim it's either a leaky trailer, leaky tarp, the driver forgot what product was on what side on a split load, or the driver dumped the product before augering was done on another product.

With vans there are so many more variables. Missing pallets, crushed cases, no seals, tipped pallets, bad forklift drivers, not inspecting during load and unload, etc etc. it can get downright ugly for van claims.
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 08:03 PM CST
Well, some haul ammonia for like $1.15. Figure that one out...
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 08:09 PM CST
Well Scott, with that thinking, wouldn't it be better to refuse the freight to begin with? The whole industry needs to stay together but just like farmers, I don't see that happening. Of course, you hafta keep your lights on too, but since when do people need to be on welfare with these paying shippers? A slippery slope for sure.
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 08:22 PM CST
- 1
Originally Posted by: CHAD JOHNSON
Quote: "At a 1.35 a mile, eventually you will loose your job or life. We all know that loads have to pay above 2.00 pm for profit. Shame on the government for not regulating some that should be regulated so we don't have to drive 18 hours a day to make small profit margins while scumbag brokers keep a lot of the loads profit."

Oh come on really? You whine like that every time you get up in the morning? No one told you, you had to drive a truck did they? Why did you get in this business if you don't know your numbers? Do you know them? Break even for you is what? I'd love to know. You should know that within a few pennies on every load. And if you get the majic $2.00 a mile, what if it costs you $1.98 to operate? KNOW YOUR COSTS!!!!! Not tryin to start anything here, but the whining must stop, and start thinking of a solution.
Replied on Mon, Feb 06, 2017 at 08:30 PM CST
Hoppers are specialized??? Since when?
Replied on Tue, Feb 07, 2017 at 09:12 AM CST
Scott. Forgive me but you're the wrong kind of broker. I've been in this industry for 32 years. I started out as a broker working for my dad. The first thing he taught me was that shippers don't set the rates unless we give them license to do so. Your job is to bring available trucks to the bargaining table and negotiate. If a shipper is throwing you cheap rates and you're force-feeding those rates to desperate truckers; you're doing the whole industry a disservice. It's better to push back on shippers and tell them their rates are unnacceptable, offering them real trucks and real rates. Let them know that at the rate they're offering, they'll only get bottom-feeders hanginging on to the end of a very slippery rope. Those trucks won't be around long, and by helping them go out of business with all the sub-standard rates, you (as a broker) and your shipper will be blamed publicly for their failure. As a result; good operators who want to stay in business will avoid working with you.
Replied on Tue, Feb 07, 2017 at 09:25 AM CST
+ 1
Originally Posted by: BILL BALDWIN
Quote: "Scott. Forgive me but you're the wrong kind of broker. I've been in this industry for 32 years. I started out as a broker working for my dad. The first thing he taught me was that shippers don't set the rates unless we give them license to do so. Your job is to bring available trucks to the bargaining table and negotiate. If a shipper is throwing you cheap rates and you're force-feeding those rates to desperate truckers; you're doing the whole industry a disservice. It's better to push back on shippers and tell them their rates are unnacceptable, offering them real trucks and real rates. Let them know that at the rate they're offering, they'll only get bottom-feeders hanginging on to the end of a very slippery rope. Those trucks won't be around long, and by helping them go out of business with all the sub-standard rates, you (as a broker) and your shipper will be blamed publicly for their failure. As a result; good operators who want to stay in business will avoid working with you."

BRAVO!!! Broker loads are a very small part of my business. But I understand that if it's handled right by both parties the broker can be the sales department for the carrier.
Replied on Tue, Feb 07, 2017 at 09:30 AM CST
Thank you for the response Bill, I can certainly appreciate your point of view, and I continue to enjoy this discussion. I'd like to consider myself a fair and compassionate guy, and I continue to do my best to make sure that both sides get a fair shake. My job here is to move loads that are given to me, as well as digging up my own loads to move. In some cases I am given loads without knowing about them first. This puts me at a disadvantage because I have not had a chance to discuss the rates involved. In other cases, I am consulted first, and asked to provide a rate that I feel comfortable with. Trust me when I say, the outcomes are totally different. My difficulty comes when I get a load with a terrible rate on it. It's something I deal with all the time. Unfortunately, I cannot simply refuse to try to book the load, That won't go over very well here. I can certainly voice my concerns, and I do, but if the load hits my board, I'm obligated to try and move it. I have many discussions with sales people about loads/rates, and in some cases, something good comes of it, and in others, not so much. Either way, I do my very best to insure a fair rate for my carriers, as well as my customers. It's a balancing act every day.