Home > Forum > Ag Exempt, Under 150 Miles, For Hire

Ag Exempt, under 150 miles, For Hire

Nov 04, 2017 at 07:38 AM CST
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Question regarding the above title. If you are hauling ag commodities and are for hire and under 150 miles. Do you need to fill out log book and follow h.o.s. or fill out time stamp cards? I cant get a straight answer. Some say you are short haul. But need to follow those rules. Others say you are exempt just run. Some say you need to fill out a log.
Replied on Sat, Nov 04, 2017 at 07:45 PM CST
Exempt doesn't matter, 100 air mile radius and 12 hrs or less time card. Anything else requires log book. Farmers running farm plates can go 150 miles without log in some states.
Replied on Sat, Nov 04, 2017 at 07:52 PM CST
Yes forgot to add apportion plated as well. Thanks for the info.
Replied on Sun, Nov 05, 2017 at 09:23 PM CST
To be sure, Call your state DOT Office . or Scale house. Then you will know .No guessing.
Replied on Wed, Nov 08, 2017 at 08:33 PM CST
Exempt does matter if u haul exempt commodities such as grain fertilizer u do not have to run log book as long as u are within 150 air miles which translates to 172.6 ground miles! The instance u go beyond 172.6 ground miles log book is required ! If you haul non exempt comodities u also do not have to use a log book within 172.6 ground miles but u are required to fill out time sheet!!
Replied on Wed, Nov 08, 2017 at 09:13 PM CST
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CALL YOUR STATE DOT OFFICE AND GET IT IN WRITING FROM AN OFFICER AND ALSO CALL YOUR INSURANCE PROVIDER AND MAKE THEM AWARE OF WHAT YOU ARE DOING. ITS VERY DUMB TO ASK LEGAL ADVICE ON HERE. LOTS OF KNOW IT ALLS. FUNNY THING IS THOUGH THEY CAN NEVER EXPLAIN WHY THEY ARE ALWAYS BROKE! THEN AGAIN RICH PEOPLE USUALLY DON'T GIVE OUT FREE ADVICE OR TELL THE WORLD EVERY THING THEY KNOW!
Replied on Wed, Nov 08, 2017 at 09:31 PM CST
You are exactly right ! My info that i posted is exactly how it was explained to me in a 3 hour meeting onbthis situation at indiana state police headquarters about this very subject , not tryin to be a know it all, not tryin to get rich either as am guessing your not either since you offerd your advice also! But you are correct in contacting your state authorities though ! Insurance company little far fetched half the state police dont know how to explain the law the ins company sure as hell wont have a clue, now thanks for joining are conversation an calling out us idiots, welcome to the idiot club!!!
Replied on Thu, Nov 09, 2017 at 07:50 AM CST
never heard of the 172.6 ground mile thing , is that just in il. or is that a blanket everywhere thing....i'll admit i'm an idiot but i'm learning
Replied on Thu, Nov 09, 2017 at 09:11 AM CST
According to indiana dot it is federal!
Replied on Thu, Nov 09, 2017 at 09:14 AM CST
ok , was wondering ,
Replied on Thu, Nov 09, 2017 at 10:57 AM CST
Hauling "non exempt" commodity (not agricultural product) as a CDL driver requires you adhere to the short haul exemption which reduces your radius to 100 air miles to not have to complete a log (you would have to still complete a daily time record). A non-CDL driver can use the 150 mile short haul exemption. Federal regs 395.1
Replied on Thu, Nov 09, 2017 at 11:09 AM CST
except in tx. where dps has extended intrastate to 150 mile radius as well as keeping the interstate100 mile radius

Replied on Sat, Nov 11, 2017 at 08:19 AM CST
Do you have this in writing
ive talked to 4 different Dot officers and get 4 different stories
ty Colin
Replied on Sun, Nov 12, 2017 at 01:26 PM CST
Originally Posted by: ROB FUQUA
Quote: "Exempt does matter if u haul exempt commodities such as grain fertilizer u do not have to run log book as long as u are within 150 air miles which translates to 172.6 ground miles! The instance u go beyond 172.6 ground miles log book is required ! If you haul non exempt comodities u also do not have to use a log book within 172.6 ground miles but u are required to fill out time sheet!! "

Ok so with time sheets. Do you still need 10 hours off between next shift? Are you limited on hours worked per week(60-70)?
Replied on Sun, Nov 12, 2017 at 01:47 PM CST
Carriers Not Subject to Hours of Service Rules (Minn. Stat. § 221.031) A carrier and its drivers are exempt from hours of service regulations if they are engaged in intrastate commerce and are:

• A farmer or farm employee transporting agricultural products, farm machinery, or supplies to or from your farm, provided you are not transporting hazardous materials of a type or quantity requiring the vehicle to be marked or placarded and you are not operating for-hire.
A private carrier transporting agricultural and other farm products within 50 miles of the carrier’s business location.
• A private carrier engaged in the transporting of construction material, tools, and equipment from shop to job site or job site to job site, for the private carrier’s use in construction, remodeling, or repair of buildings, structures or their appurtenances.
• A private carrier who is a public utility, electric co-op, or telephone company.
• A carrier providing transportation as described in Minn. Stat. § 221.025, except as in clause 2 (solid waste). See “Exempt Carriers” in Section 13. Minnesota Trucking Regulations 71
Transporting agricultural commodities or farm supplies for agricultural purposes within a 150 air mile radius in Minnesota during the planting and harvesting seasons from March 15 to December 15 each year.
• Transporting sugar beets during the harvesting season from September 1 to May 15 each year within a 150 air mile radius.
• A driver of a Covered Farm Vehicle. (See Section 20 for the definition of a Covered Farm Vehicle.)
• A motor carrier of Railroad Employee (Minn. Stat. §221.0255 has specific rules for hours of service for Motor Carriers of Railroad Employees).

REFERENCE: http://www.dot.state.mn.us/cvo/mcr/MnTruckRegl/sect10.pdf
Replied on Sun, Nov 12, 2017 at 01:50 PM CST
Originally Posted by: KEVIN SINGLETARY
Quote: "never heard of the 172.6 ground mile thing , is that just in il. or is that a blanket everywhere thing....i'll admit i'm an idiot but i'm learning"

Air Miles and Statute Miles
In the short-haul exceptions to the hours-of-service regulations, you will see the term “air miles.” This is a different measurement of a mile than what is used for statute miles on a roadmap. An air mile is longer than a statute mile. There are 6,076 feet in an air mile and 5,280 feet in a statute mile. One-hundred air miles is equal to 115.08 statute miles. Therefore, a 100 air-mile radius from your work reporting location can be figured as 115.08 statute, or “roadmap,” miles (185.2 km) from your work reporting location. A 150 air-mile radius from your work reporting location can be figured as 172.6 statute miles (277.8 km).
Replied on Sun, Nov 12, 2017 at 02:14 PM CST
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Originally Posted by: KEVIN SINGLETARY
Quote: "never heard of the 172.6 ground mile thing , is that just in il. or is that a blanket everywhere thing....i'll admit i'm an idiot but i'm learning"

Air Miles and Statute Miles
In the short-haul exceptions to the hours-of-service regulations, you will see the term “air miles.” This is a different measurement of a mile than what is used for statute miles on a road map.
An air mile is longer than a statute mile. There are 6,076 feet in an air mile and 5,280 feet in a statute mile. One-hundred air miles is equal to 115.08 statute miles.
Therefore, a 100 air-mile radius from your work reporting location can be figured as 115.08 statute, or “roadmap,” miles (185.2 km) from your work reporting location. A 150 air-mile radius from your work reporting location can be figured as 172.6 statute miles (277.8 km).
REFERENCE: https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/Drivers%20Guide%20to%20HOS%202015_508.pdf
Replied on Sun, Nov 12, 2017 at 05:34 PM CST
Originally Posted by: HOWARD RASMUSSEN
Quote: " Air Miles and Statute Miles In the short-haul exceptions to the hours-of-service regulations, you will see the term “air miles.” This is a different measurement of a mile than what is used for statute miles on a road map. An air mile is longer than a statute mile. There are 6,076 feet in an air mile and 5,280 feet in a statute mile. One-hundred air miles is equal to 115.08 statute miles. Therefore, a 100 air-mile radius from your work reporting location can be figured as 115.08 statute, or “roadmap,” miles (185.2 km) from your work reporting location. A 150 air-mile radius from your work reporting location can be figured as 172.6 statute miles (277.8 km). REFERENCE: https://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/sites/fmcsa.dot.gov/files/docs/Drivers%20Guide%20to%20HOS%202015_508.pdf"

Hope the word gets out to all the migratory birds that air miles are longer so they can get an earlier start.