Home > Forum > Hauling 97,000 Lbs In Mn

hauling 97,000 lbs in mn

Apr 25, 2016 at 11:26 PM CST
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So i was looking into getting a heavy haul truck and hopper bottom with the liftable axle to be able to haul 97,000 lbs legally, talked to a guy hauling wheat to the cities from south dakota today and he said its great untill you have to load fertilizer to 80k max just like everyone else... only you weigh 5k more then your standard 5 axle rig. So anyone currently running the 6 or 7 axle set up in mn? Im just curious if its worth it
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 01:11 PM CST
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I'm currently running 6 axles and for what I'm hauling in and out of the cities for I can't pencil it out. I'm going back to 5 axle. a lot of bs and permits.
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 02:09 PM CST
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stay with a tandem setup and then you can cross borders and not have to worry about permits and can run the interstate system which is alot quicker....I have a 7 axle set up and MN permit is 500 bucks for the year. If you go grains to haul both ways in MN its good but other wise its a waste of time and money.......
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 02:34 PM CST
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down here in texas we never had a problem running 110 to 120 on 5 axles.... as far as i know the only time it was illegal is when we got caught....
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 03:19 PM CST
Think of it like this, you are hauling wheat from Watertown SD to St Paul @ $20/ton. thats $640 for 32 tons or $500 for 25 tons. 3.04/loaded mile on 7 axles or 2.38 on 5 axles. a new 7 axle short sided timpte is about 45,000 give or take. I think we can make the payments on an extra .66/mile, Good luck with your decision
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 03:43 PM CST
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the last new tri axle timpte I seen for sale was closer to $55000. but maybe you are getting the farmer discount. figure out the fuel mileage, payment difference, license/permit costs and tell me how much more you're making.
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 04:03 PM CST
Permits cost $500 for the year, say you get 4 MPG instead of 6 MPG, that cost you an extra .21/mi. payment on a trailer is say $400/mo more. so at $100/week you are spending .05/mi more for the trailer payment. so to spend an extra .26/mi and return .66/mi is an easy choice for me. of course tires and insurance and all this comes into play also, but our policy and repairs did not increase by a third when we started running 7 axle trucks. Not trying to argue just giving this gentleman my honest opinion.
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 04:35 PM CST
1065 bushel in and 24 ton out is roughly $1172. 885 bushel in and 26.5 tons out is roughly $1105. on 500 miles the difference is .14 cents a mile. paying for the permits extra license extra trailer payment and adding the price of a pusher into all that isn't worth 14 cents a mile. and no I'm not trying to argue with anybody but the numbers don't lie. if Minnesota would allow the weights both ways then I agree its worth hauling more. not the way its setup now
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 07:49 PM CST
Sticking with tandems gvies you freedom to run all the united states and into canada all year around with no worries about breaking any rules,,,Since I switched over to adding a pusher on my tractor it cuts me out of canada,,,,and it gained me rouhtly 2000 pounds of more weiight......If you got a guaranteed gig of grain in and out of minnesota allllllllll year long year after year I would agree 7 axle setup is the best,,,,but nothing is guaranteed.

7 axles are pemits, more maintenance, more fuel ,,,and more weight......me personally say listen to your heart and the numbers you come up with..... everyone else that tells you all this stuff to do goes home at night watches tv,,eats ,,and goes to sleep and comes back to work from 8 am to 5 pm,,,,,,,Owner/operator has the payments always and banks don't like waiting for their money........keep operating costs low and save on fuel, repairs, n permits escpecially now while the rates are still a little rough out on the road yet.

When MN changes its rules then it might be good to also go with 7 axles,,,,,but having the freedom going anywhere and anytime is pretty good to do.
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 10:33 PM CST
I'm thinking when or if mn changes its rules so that grain isnt the only thing you can carry to 97,000 then il get the proper trailer until then i think its probably not worth it the not being able to use I 94, and I 35 would make more headaches and mean less time at home and more time getting there... Good advice
Replied on Tue, Apr 26, 2016 at 10:37 PM CST
Yeah I see your point. but if your going to be coming out of North Dakota sometimes because I dont have dedicated routes I set up what i can out of town and haul wheat back to the mill in Hastings it would suck to not be able to take 94 and time is money
Replied on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 07:57 AM CST
even if they pass it so everything can be hauled heavier I don't see them letting you be on the interstate. that's the way iowa is set-up
Replied on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 08:16 AM CST
Last fall I was looking at buying a new trailer and trying to decide between a 42 foot two axle or a 51 foot 3 axle. There was a $13000 difference and with the extra weight I was only about to haul about a 3000# more product. My opinion is find the lightest 5 axle truck and trailer and get after it.
Replied on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 09:50 AM CST
Consider the gains of a very efficient 5 axle set up. Wide single tires will save almost 100 lbs per wheel position, 800 lbs tractor and trailer and a little fuel savings. A 6x2 axle setup can take off 500 lbs and save fuel. I know because I have done it. Picked up almost 1/2 mpg from the 6x2. Liftable axles help too. This stuff may not work for everyone and the 6x2 isn't cheap. I have learned some tricks and it works well for me with a walking floor.
Replied on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 10:01 AM CST
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Originally Posted by: DEAN HUGHSON
Quote: "Consider the gains of a very efficient 5 axle set up. Wide single tires will save almost 100 lbs per wheel position, 800 lbs tractor and trailer and a little fuel savings. A 6x2 axle setup can take off 500 lbs and save fuel. I know because I have done it. Picked up almost 1/2 mpg from the 6x2. Liftable axles help too. This stuff may not work for everyone and the 6x2 isn't cheap. I have learned some tricks and it works well for me with a walking floor."

If your running steel wheels and convert to aluminum singles it's about 1200 lbs per tandem. I'm all for the light truck setup. Have one day cab with a single tank still on duals and when he's hooked to a hopper on singles his empty weight is right at 24,000, and with the overload permit in TX he can legally carry 60,000. Can't run the interstate but out of the field that's not a problem. The biggest flaw amongst the owner ops down here is they all buy the biggest truck possible (large car Pete with 70" sleeper) and then haul loads that pay based on weight. It costs to look cool and what is mind boggling is most rarely sleep in their trucks as they run local and are home nightly. Spec your rig to make money and then get after it.
Replied on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 10:22 AM CST
You guys are beating yourselves down in your own game by going heavier and I by no means saying what your doing is wrong, each truck or company needs to make the best decision for their ownself, however On the short term the concept looks like a great idea as you think your per mile amounts will increase, but on the long run aggregate of the concept you are depleting potential available loads and thus increasing the supply of trucks available while decreasing the demand of loads to haul. For instance if MN moves 25,000,000 tons of product via truck in a year, on the standard 80,000 pounds at an average of 26 ton per load, that equates out to a total of 961,538.46 loads to move, if all the trucks go to 97,000 pounds and haul on average 32 ton per load that equates to 781,250 loads to move. Supply and demand is what sets the rates, less trucks more loads equals higher rates, more trucks less loads equals lower rates, at the heavier weight, you now have 180,288 less loads available for the trucks to compete on which in turn will push rates down, the other portion that will push rates down is the fact that at 32 ton your per mile can increase thus needing less per ton to make your haul work for a per mile basis. Just my opinion on one of the problems with current rates. The shippers want trucks to haul more as they can keep rates at a lower amount, thus increasing their profits, trucks should want the opposite, the trucks need to learn to create the demand rather than increase the supply.
Replied on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 10:37 AM CST
I agree with the light weight tandems. But, we operate primarily in KS, so multiple axle rigs don't benefit us much as I would only net about 2,500 lbs more if I was lucky. We are around 24.5-24.7K full of fuel with T660's and Timpte 42' American Ag hoppers. Can haul 1000 bu and be under 81K. Have had the rigs as light as 23.8K but wouldn't make it far on fuel. Trucks and trailers were special ordered with every light weight option we could get. We still have 32" sleepers, for the rare occasion when we might need to stay out. Running small block power with autoshifts. VIT interior, full gauges, PW/PL, heated leather seats. Trailers have elect tarp, hyd traps, PSI, etc We can scale more than most operators here do with a triple, and can run the interstate. Our combination won't work for everyone, but it's worked well for us.
Replied on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 11:06 AM CST
Originally Posted by: RYAN HUNT
Quote: "You guys are beating yourselves down in your own game by going heavier and I by no means saying what your doing is wrong, each truck or company needs to make the best decision for their ownself, however On the short term the concept looks like a great idea as you think your per mile amounts will increase, but on the long run aggregate of the concept you are depleting potential available loads and thus increasing the supply of trucks available while decreasing the demand of loads to haul. For instance if MN moves 25,000,000 tons of product via truck in a year, on the standard 80,000 pounds at an average of 26 ton per load, that equates out to a total of 961,538.46 loads to move, if all the trucks go to 97,000 pounds and haul on average 32 ton per load that equates to 781,250 loads to move. Supply and demand is what sets the rates, less trucks more loads equals higher rates, more trucks less loads equals lower rates, at the heavier weight, you now have 180,288 less loads available for the trucks to compete on which in turn will push rates down, the other portion that will push rates down is the fact that at 32 ton your per mile can increase thus needing less per ton to make your haul work for a per mile basis. Just my opinion on one of the problems with current rates. The shippers want trucks to haul more as they can keep rates at a lower amount, thus increasing their profits, trucks should want the opposite, the trucks need to learn to create the demand rather than increase the supply. "

I agree ....we are already seeing that. Now alot of the places are wanting us to haul 88000 and still do it for $2/loaded mile.
Replied on Wed, Apr 27, 2016 at 11:37 AM CST
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Originally Posted by: RYAN KELLEN
Quote: "I agree ....we are already seeing that. Now alot of the places are wanting us to haul 88000 and still do it for $2/loaded mile."

that just the things. these places see you can haul more and want it done cheaper. I didn't buy an expensive trailer to haul for less. but there's people willing to do it. and that's why the rates are where they are today
Replied on Sat, Apr 30, 2016 at 09:52 PM CST
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I agree with you to an extent my only return fire is most of the time you will have to take a longer route to avoid the interstate to "legally" be able to haul 97k and we all know going to the cities avoiding the interstate is pretty tough. My other return fire is fuel mileage. One should be able to pull a minimum of 6 mpg to as high as 8 mpg pulling a tandem hopper where as pulling a triple you will be very lucky to get 6 for an overall avg. I have both setups so im speaking from personal experience on that, the overall cost to own a tandem is much more advantageous in MN, IMO. Especially if you are hauling legally and ever hauling fertilizer. No permits required for pulling a tandem at 80k
Replied on Mon, May 02, 2016 at 03:43 PM CST
The question was clearly about mn. You always analyze from the legal pdrdpective. Ypu gave the stupidest answer ever on this forum.
Replied on Tue, May 03, 2016 at 06:51 PM CST
We run wood in wi at 98000, 6 axles, no interstate, when this law went through several years ago our prices on the wood took a shit along with the Trucking rates, I would think you would be looking at the same outcome