Home > Forum > Hopper Load Times And Cancelled Loads

Hopper load times and cancelled loads

Oct 15, 2015 at 01:41 PM CST
- 1
I've only been dispatching bulk for about 3 months but it seems to me that there are a tremendous number of last minute load cancellations and loading/unloading times are averaging 4 hours plus. Is this really normal? If it is, how does anyone get a paycheck? From what I've figured, when logs are run 100% legal, 4 hour load/unload times mean only 6 driving hours=330ish miles=$3300 weekly gross if all miles are at $2/mi (I wish!). I know certain ones to stay away from but beyond that, is there anything that can be done?
Replied on Thu, Oct 15, 2015 at 02:21 PM CST
When times get slow shippers and receivers no longer need the truckers as much nor do the care as much. Just the nature of the biz
Replied on Thu, Oct 15, 2015 at 02:51 PM CST
+ 1
Is it actually better during peak season? (Please say yes!) I realize that van freight is a much different animal than bulk and there are reasons for load/unload times to vary significantly on the bulk side but at least vans are able to get detention after 2 hours. And all the cancelled loads? Is that a year-round thing because of the nature of bulk products and processes or just another example of the out of balance supply and demand? I can only hope that somewhere along the line shippers have to step up their business practices or be left without truckers. I know this has been a problem forever - and for everyone - but I definitely think they take more advantage of bulk carriers than others and it's just not right. (Try telling shippers that, right? lol!)
Replied on Thu, Oct 15, 2015 at 03:06 PM CST
+ 1
In the bulk world it gets worse instead of better during peak season. More trucks in line, the elevators, mills can't keep up. Lines and trunks break down. The only thing worse than the hopper IMO is the containers. At least the customers on the hopper side are generally polite and the schedules are flexible (unless you are hauling finish products, and they are the worst about their attitudes and delays). I have a truck that could have delivered yesterday, but the customer in Davenport would not take it. Driver came back today at 11:00 am and still is not even over the pit. Does no good to gripe and complain, just deal with it. I told the driver this morning if it continues in this fashion that I would go and buy another dry van and park the hopper until the rates come back up. With the harvest we are having that may be next year before it comes back. Oh, well it bounces that way sometimes, at least we have other options.
Replied on Thu, Oct 15, 2015 at 03:42 PM CST
That's what I was afraid of. I know when we get somewhere that uses a lot of trucks, they can't keep up and wait time is horrendous. My loaded /mi rate is better in the last couple of weeks than what it was so that gives me a glimmer of hope but it's certainly not enough to counter the sit time. I guess time will tell if it's going to get any better this year.
Replied on Thu, Oct 15, 2015 at 04:35 PM CST
If you're dealing with grain (corn) to the chicken market you can thank (some of) the resellers for the lines. When ABC Chicken buys from DEF (the reseller) and ABC says I need corn DEF in turns calls and tells all the elevators that they bought corn from and tells them that ABC is taking corn. The elevators load the trucks and send them. Three or four trucks from several locations and then you have the line. ABC goes full of corn and now you wait for them to grind off or hope DEF can find another place to go with the corn. Keep in mind that MNO and RST chicken is dealing with the same thing as ABC of being over shipped on corn from DEF.

The other feed stocks are usually managed a little better on space and usage vs. ordering. But then some buyers want to make sure they don't run out so they over order so they know they won't run out.

Breakdowns and weather can play a big part in someone being full. Cold weather and the birds eat more, buyers are taking that into account when ordering feed stock but a bunch of unseasonably warm days in the fall/winter can affect the amount of feed that is required.

The herd of corn trucks that DEF has sent to the feed mills will also make your line/wait longer.

Just my 2 cents.




Replied on Thu, Oct 15, 2015 at 05:22 PM CST
- 1
Originally Posted by: DUSTIN MYERS
Quote: "That's what I was afraid of. I know when we get somewhere that uses a lot of trucks, they can't keep up and wait time is horrendous. My loaded /mi rate is better in the last couple of weeks than what it was so that gives me a glimmer of hope but it's certainly not enough to counter the sit time. I guess time will tell if it's going to get any better this year."

Forgot to mention the wonderful washouts that cost $100.00 each on the average that everybody thinks are free, not to mention the extra miles sometimes to go to one, as well as the time involved with the lines there as well. Does not really matter though we all know that a trucker is not worth more than the burger flipper at McDonald's, and the wonder why drivers are running away from this industry in droves. I tell the newbs how bad it sucks and that it is not getting better every chance I get, for those of us that it is in our blood, well we are just to stupid and stubborn to quit. Even as stupid as I am, I realize that things better start getting better or I too will park my equipment and just take a job at Home Depot for $16 - $20 per hour and stock shelves.
Replied on Fri, Oct 16, 2015 at 10:31 AM CST
+ 1
Originally Posted by: ALFRED JORDAN
Quote: "Forgot to mention the wonderful washouts that cost $100.00 each on the average that everybody thinks are free, not to mention the extra miles sometimes to go to one, as well as the time involved with the lines there as well. Does not really matter though we all know that a trucker is not worth more than the burger flipper at McDonald's, and the wonder why drivers are running away from this industry in droves. I tell the newbs how bad it sucks and that it is not getting better every chance I get, for those of us that it is in our blood, well we are just to stupid and stubborn to quit. Even as stupid as I am, I realize that things better start getting better or I too will park my equipment and just take a job at Home Depot for $16 - $20 per hour and stock shelves."

These are the reasons I bought a step deck. Better rates, no washout, no driving 150 miles out of the way to get a washout just to load the same product. I prefer pulling a hopper to anything I just can't do it anymore. Around NW Mo. There are so many farmers with multiple semis. There are no short haul loads. I made my best money running over 700 mile trips.
Thank you Alfred for all you do to help inform those of us that are trying to make a living. Information is education.
Replied on Sat, Oct 17, 2015 at 01:53 PM CST
+ 1
Originally Posted by: JOE BLOW
Quote: "These are the reasons I bought a step deck. Better rates, no washout, no driving 150 miles out of the way to get a washout just to load the same product. I prefer pulling a hopper to anything I just can't do it anymore. Around NW Mo. There are so many farmers with multiple semis. There are no short haul loads. I made my best money running over 700 mile trips. Thank you Alfred for all you do to help inform those of us that are trying to make a living. Information is education."

Thanks, here is what I say about the whole thing:

Farmers should stick to Farming
Truckers should stick to Trucking
Brokers should stick to brokering trucks not freight
Manufacterers should stick to making widgets not brokering freight
Builders should stick to building

The story of Farmer A and Farmer B

When I was a builder Farmer A asked us to build his house and machine shed ( 20,000 sf) for him. He did not like our price and stated that he was going to do it himself with his hands. About 6 months into the project 3 of his hands quit and came to work for me on another project we had going on just down the road for Farmer B. Farmer A's hands grew weary of working most of the day on the farm for $10 - $12 per hour, and then had to start working on the house until sunset. When Farmer A's hands heard that I was paying $15 - $20 per hour and only working eight hours a day for five days a week, they quickly came over and asked for a job, which I put them to work the next day. Farmer A had put up his farm as colleteral for his building project as did Farmer B, but Farmer A ended up losing his Farm and all that he owned because he thought that he could do it all and put money in his pocket while doing so. Farmer B ended up buying Farmer A's farm from the bank and hired us to tear down the wreck of a house that Farmer A had started and paid us to put up the 20,000 sf machine shed for him. Farmer B than had us build a smaller house as well and hired Farmer A to manage the new acqusistion for him. By the way Farmer A and Farmer B were brothers, they just somehow seemed to think entirely differant. Sometimes when we think we can do it all by ourselves we end up finding that others will not be there for us in our time of need.

Replied on Sun, Oct 18, 2015 at 11:54 AM CST
+ 1
Dustin , what do you think is going to happen when ELD's are mandated and we start demanding pay for every second the computerized log is running ? I hope it turns the industry upside down. We think it is going to grid lock the industry, so we have started a savings fund for if it happens we can sit and wait
Replied on Mon, Oct 19, 2015 at 09:59 AM CST
+ 1
I appreciate all of the info. I know a driver told mine that Tyson will pay detention over 2 hours at all of their plants but I won't believe that until I see it. Not to mention that I'd rather get paid for rolling than sitting. I did have one broker that brought it to my attention that the CNEE would pay detention after 2 hours (and we received $30/hr detention). I'm sure there are others but then again we're in a catch 22 - ask for detention and you'll get some who will think you're too much hassle and risk to use again but if you don't, you take all the hit on missed loads and lost time. I hate overregulation but shippers need to be responsible for their end. I think detention should be part of every contract. If only, right? Cancelled loads - same thing. I don't cancel on them even when I put myself in a bind because I gave my word I'd be there. Doesn't seem others put much value behind their word. (I had TWO loads cancel before 9 am today alone!)
Replied on Mon, Oct 19, 2015 at 10:06 AM CST
Originally Posted by: DAVID HAYES
Quote: "If you're dealing with grain (corn) to the chicken market you can thank (some of) the resellers for the lines. When ABC Chicken buys from DEF (the reseller) and ABC says I need corn DEF in turns calls and tells all the elevators that they bought corn from and tells them that ABC is taking corn. The elevators load the trucks and send them. Three or four trucks from several locations and then you have the line. ABC goes full of corn and now you wait for them to grind off or hope DEF can find another place to go with the corn. Keep in mind that MNO and RST chicken is dealing with the same thing as ABC of being over shipped on corn from DEF. The other feed stocks are usually managed a little better on space and usage vs. ordering. But then some buyers want to make sure they don't run out so they over order so they know they won't run out. Breakdowns and weather can play a big part in someone being full. Cold weather and the birds eat more, buyers are taking that into account when ordering feed stock but a bunch of unseasonably warm days in the fall/winter can affect the amount of feed that is required. The herd of corn trucks that DEF has sent to the feed mills will also make your line/wait longer. Just my 2 cents. "

I wondered if this wasn't part of the problem. I wonder how they'd like it if I overbooked my truck like they overbook their loads? Well, I have a pretty good idea. But since they have nothing to lose, that will continue to be my problem, not theirs.
Replied on Mon, Oct 19, 2015 at 10:31 AM CST
Originally Posted by: DUSTIN MYERS
Quote: "I appreciate all of the info. I know a driver told mine that Tyson will pay detention over 2 hours at all of their plants but I won't believe that until I see it. Not to mention that I'd rather get paid for rolling than sitting. I did have one broker that brought it to my attention that the CNEE would pay detention after 2 hours (and we received $30/hr detention). I'm sure there are others but then again we're in a catch 22 - ask for detention and you'll get some who will think you're too much hassle and risk to use again but if you don't, you take all the hit on missed loads and lost time. I hate overregulation but shippers need to be responsible for their end. I think detention should be part of every contract. If only, right? Cancelled loads - same thing. I don't cancel on them even when I put myself in a bind because I gave my word I'd be there. Doesn't seem others put much value behind their word. (I had TWO loads cancel before 9 am today alone!)"

Tyson will pay after 2 hours of detention, however many brokers will not advertise this. I have always had to ask for detention for my drivers. I actually get kind of pushy about it.
Replied on Mon, Oct 19, 2015 at 11:27 AM CST
Originally Posted by: JASON WEAST
Quote: "Dustin , what do you think is going to happen when ELD's are mandated and we start demanding pay for every second the computerized log is running ? I hope it turns the industry upside down. We think it is going to grid lock the industry, so we have started a savings fund for if it happens we can sit and wait"

My driver and I discussed this just this weekend. It's coming and unfortunately it will be a matter of who can get through that first stage without completely going under. I'm not sure what our strategy will be for weathering the storm but having a strategy will be imperative. Can we afford to park our trucks for a few months while shippers scramble to find trucks? I hope so because I believe that's what it will take. And truthfully, I think the industry is already at that point, ELDs will just be the catalyst that [hopefully] forces shippers to make changes.

I have seen the benefits of ELDs in larger companies. Dispatchers can no longer pretend they don't require drivers to run when they shouldn't be but it comes at a high cost to the driver. I hope that a mandate would have a similar effect on shippers but I'm only cautiously optimistic. I'm concerned that it will instead open the door to big companies simply hiring more drivers and completely pushing out the O/O. Since big companies work in volume, only their drivers will suffer. But who cares about them, right?

They claim a driver shortage now (which seems to me just to be a trucking company's way of saying "we don't pay our drivers enough and can't keep anyone"). I guess that won't be such a problem if O/O are forced to either sign on with a big company or shut down permanently. Suddenly the ELD's will have "cured the driver shortage", although drivers will be making less. And sadly, your average Joe Voter won't be here to back the guys who bring their everything because they're afraid of trucks that they don't understand.

The only way O/O will be able to get back in the game is for rates to go up, detention to be consistently paid, and some actual PLANNING AND SCHEDULING to be done at the shipper/cnee. I hate appointments but if it meant no more than an hour wait and was reasonable (no 36 hours for a 4 hour drive or vice versa) and a little felxible, I'd be ok with it and would be willing to be a little flexible with them on the wait time. It's a give and take but right now it seems that drivers do the giving, shippers do the taking. I hope that ELDs will eventually cause shippers to see these things but my normally optimistic self isn't so optimistic on this one.

In the end, I believe you're right that it will turn the industry on its head but which way it actually goes will be a wait and see. Either way, it will have a dramatic impact on the country and everyone in it. Joe Voter might just reconsider his disdain for that "dangerous trucker" a little too late.
Replied on Mon, Oct 19, 2015 at 11:32 AM CST
Originally Posted by: CINDY NEAL
Quote: "Tyson will pay after 2 hours of detention, however many brokers will not advertise this. I have always had to ask for detention for my drivers. I actually get kind of pushy about it."

Do you ask on all loads where your wait time is over 2 hours? I generally only ask if it's really excessive (like 17 hours at an ADM - I got pushy on that one).
Replied on Mon, Oct 19, 2015 at 07:31 PM CST
+ 1
Had a load one time of milo to a dog food plant. Elevator was sending all the trucks they could get. Driver got to plant around 10pm behind a big line of trucks. At 8 am they told him and a couple others they were full and didn't want load. I got on phone. The elevator agreed to pay us for load, and a half rate to bring it back. The dog food plant paid detention of $50 an hour. I give my drivers all of the detention and he got 27% of freight. He was ready to do a load like that every night! Never hurts to ask.

Replied on Tue, Oct 20, 2015 at 09:31 AM CST
Originally Posted by: DANIEL CORBIN
Quote: "Had a load one time of milo to a dog food plant. Elevator was sending all the trucks they could get. Driver got to plant around 10pm behind a big line of trucks. At 8 am they told him and a couple others they were full and didn't want load. I got on phone. The elevator agreed to pay us for load, and a half rate to bring it back. The dog food plant paid detention of $50 an hour. I give my drivers all of the detention and he got 27% of freight. He was ready to do a load like that every night! Never hurts to ask. "

Personally I think detention pay should be at least $100 an hour. Truck still has expenses and paying the driver. Especially when you sit somewhere all day or all nite to get loaded/unloaded. I had a few pay it was like $300 for 10 plus hours. But that was no where near what I lost by missing my reloads because they had some issue or another.
Replied on Tue, Oct 20, 2015 at 03:47 PM CST

Dustin,

No, I don't ask on EVERY load. I try to be reasonable about it and I must mention that I don't always get it, but I do ask.

Hope that helps. I know it is terrible sometimes. My husband is a driver and I dispatch him. Sometimes I go with him for 2-3 weekds at a time and have been with him to sit for several hours (up to 36 once or twice) and I know how bad it can be. Sorry you are having a rough time.

Replied on Tue, Oct 20, 2015 at 03:52 PM CST
This sounds like the time I agreed to take a load out of NC to go to TN near Nashville. (We live near KC). I was assured that there was a reload coming through home . This was a Friday. He got unloaded and I got told that the reload had canceled until Tuesday. I kindly explained to them that we would not sit until Tuesday so therefore I was going to bill them for $2.20 a mile for 500 miles to bounce him home. And to my astonishment, they paid it.
Replied on Tue, Oct 20, 2015 at 08:19 PM CST
+ 1
Originally Posted by: JOE BLOW
Quote: "Personally I think detention pay should be at least $100 an hour. Truck still has expenses and paying the driver. Especially when you sit somewhere all day or all nite to get loaded/unloaded. I had a few pay it was like $300 for 10 plus hours. But that was no where near what I lost by missing my reloads because they had some issue or another. "

I try not to beat up our customers on ether end, becouse most of the time they are just that both customers. We may hual in to a place and a week/month later we maybe hauling loads out. They don't beat use up when we have trouble. Most of my drivers like to be first in line in morning so they sleep in truck any ways.
Replied on Tue, Oct 20, 2015 at 11:07 PM CST
Originally Posted by: DANIEL CORBIN
Quote: "I try not to beat up our customers on ether end, becouse most of the time they are just that both customers. We may hual in to a place and a week/month later we maybe hauling loads out. They don't beat use up when we have trouble. Most of my drivers like to be first in line in morning so they sleep in truck any ways. "

There are a few places that consistently are messed up! I can think of 3 right off the top of my head I really doubt you haul into any of them. Pilgrims at Mount Plesant Texas. I expect to be there 24 hours going in no matter what I load but blood meal is at least 24. I have been there 4 days trying to get a load of chicken meal. I was supposed to load on Friday dump in Topeka on Sat reload sat to Ohio, but instead the first load took 6 hours to load sitting in load out then the protein level wasn't high enough. They asked me to dump it on Monday at Rosser Tx. I did I reloaded load didn't test out again Tuesday dumped at Rosser. Pulled in to load Tuesday lady was giving me grief because there was dust in my trailer but the loaded after they tested it. Then it was 2:00pm they wanted to know if I could get it dumped in Topeka yet the same day. I was promised pay from the plant for all this and never saw a dime. These are where I think $100 an hour is fair!
I have three other places and similar situations in mind.
Pet Solutions in Danville, Ark.and Tyson at Scranton, Ark
i have donated a lot of time with all three places. If I had my way all three would be paying every truck that sits there over 2 hours $100 an hour.
its not scheduling with these three it's messed up every time I would go there.
I am patient to a point, these three well it's always over 12 hours!
Replied on Wed, Oct 21, 2015 at 12:29 AM CST
+ 3
Originally Posted by: JOE BLOW
Quote: "There are a few places that consistently are messed up! I can think of 3 right off the top of my head I really doubt you haul into any of them. Pilgrims at Mount Plesant Texas. I expect to be there 24 hours going in no matter what I load but blood meal is at least 24. I have been there 4 days trying to get a load of chicken meal. I was supposed to load on Friday dump in Topeka on Sat reload sat to Ohio, but instead the first load took 6 hours to load sitting in load out then the protein level wasn't high enough. They asked me to dump it on Monday at Rosser Tx. I did I reloaded load didn't test out again Tuesday dumped at Rosser. Pulled in to load Tuesday lady was giving me grief because there was dust in my trailer but the loaded after they tested it. Then it was 2:00pm they wanted to know if I could get it dumped in Topeka yet the same day. I was promised pay from the plant for all this and never saw a dime. These are where I think $100 an hour is fair! I have three other places and similar situations in mind. Pet Solutions in Danville, Ark.and Tyson at Scranton, Ark i have donated a lot of time with all three places. If I had my way all three would be paying every truck that sits there over 2 hours $100 an hour. its not scheduling with these three it's messed up every time I would go there. I am patient to a point, these three well it's always over 12 hours!"

Here is our rule if you don't want to pay detention and you operate a crap hole operation. Then we can give up the hours to find out the first time, if you cause us to give up hours again (strike two). We then expect to be paid $6 per mile to go to those places. It is our way of getting paid the detention in advance, some of these places just leave you sitting in the holding area until they are good and ready to load. Last night one of such customers was holding our truck hostage, when we informed them that the driver had been there long enough and he was running out of hours and did not desire to stay at their facility. All of the sudden when our driver got ready to leave they offered to load him and pay us for layover pay. Funny they would rather pay layover pay vs detention. I really don't care what the name for the compensation is as long as they pay it. If not then just leave and bounce to the next load. Being reasonable is when the plant goes down, or the auger jams, or the such. We understand those types of problems and would not want to hold that against a customer, as we would not want to be financially punished when our equipment goes down. Incompetence on the other hand I believe the customer should have to pay for, same holds true with incompetent truckers that fail to do their job, the customer should not have to pay the full amount.
Replied on Wed, Oct 21, 2015 at 08:53 AM CST
Originally Posted by: ALFRED JORDAN
Quote: "Here is our rule if you don't want to pay detention and you operate a crap hole operation. Then we can give up the hours to find out the first time, if you cause us to give up hours again (strike two). We then expect to be paid $6 per mile to go to those places. It is our way of getting paid the detention in advance, some of these places just leave you sitting in the holding area until they are good and ready to load. Last night one of such customers was holding our truck hostage, when we informed them that the driver had been there long enough and he was running out of hours and did not desire to stay at their facility. All of the sudden when our driver got ready to leave they offered to load him and pay us for layover pay. Funny they would rather pay layover pay vs detention. I really don't care what the name for the compensation is as long as they pay it. If not then just leave and bounce to the next load. Being reasonable is when the plant goes down, or the auger jams, or the such. We understand those types of problems and would not want to hold that against a customer, as we would not want to be financially punished when our equipment goes down. Incompetence on the other hand I believe the customer should have to pay for, same holds true with incompetent truckers that fail to do their job, the customer should not have to pay the full amount."

Great strategy! Thanks!
Replied on Wed, Oct 21, 2015 at 10:00 AM CST
Originally Posted by: ALFRED JORDAN
Quote: "Here is our rule if you don't want to pay detention and you operate a crap hole operation. Then we can give up the hours to find out the first time, if you cause us to give up hours again (strike two). We then expect to be paid $6 per mile to go to those places. It is our way of getting paid the detention in advance, some of these places just leave you sitting in the holding area until they are good and ready to load. Last night one of such customers was holding our truck hostage, when we informed them that the driver had been there long enough and he was running out of hours and did not desire to stay at their facility. All of the sudden when our driver got ready to leave they offered to load him and pay us for layover pay. Funny they would rather pay layover pay vs detention. I really don't care what the name for the compensation is as long as they pay it. If not then just leave and bounce to the next load. Being reasonable is when the plant goes down, or the auger jams, or the such. We understand those types of problems and would not want to hold that against a customer, as we would not want to be financially punished when our equipment goes down. Incompetence on the other hand I believe the customer should have to pay for, same holds true with incompetent truckers that fail to do their job, the customer should not have to pay the full amount."

Thank you.
That first load at Mount Plesant the loader told me he could blend enough pure chicken meal with what I was loading to raise the protein level for the customer. Management decided against that ( cost to much). I started pulling a step deck and unless the rates in hopper freight increase drastically I see no reason to come back to hoppers. I started out driving pulling a hopper at 21 and I love it. That was 30 plus years ago. I have pulled just about every trailer type in that time, I'm just not going to do it for free or lose money anymore.
Out of all the loads I have hauled. i deal with waiting very well if there is a line or the plant is broke down, something out of there control, I hauled several loads that paid me well that I was expected to sit around on both ends $900 to go 50 miles but you waited usually on both ends.
Alfred I learn something from you ever time you post, I truly appreciate everything I can learn from all of the people on here that are trying to help all of us become better at business!
Replied on Wed, Oct 21, 2015 at 11:38 AM CST
+ 1
Originally Posted by: CINDY NEAL
Quote: "This sounds like the time I agreed to take a load out of NC to go to TN near Nashville. (We live near KC). I was assured that there was a reload coming through home . This was a Friday. He got unloaded and I got told that the reload had canceled until Tuesday. I kindly explained to them that we would not sit until Tuesday so therefore I was going to bill them for $2.20 a mile for 500 miles to bounce him home. And to my astonishment, they paid it."

That's amazing, Cindy! I had one in particular up in MI that was 9 miles from our prior delivery. Got hung up (thankfully) at that cnee because before we could get over to load, they cancelled because the destination plant broke down. Wouldn't have been too much of a problem except that it put us with no load for about 24 hours and when I finally got something, it was a 90 mile run that was almost 300 miles away. From there it just was more of the same. I asked the broker about a Truck Order Not Used (something I've never asked for because I can usually come up with an alternative) but I might as well have been speaking Japanese. She had no idea what it was and couldn't understand why I would want someone to pay for the cancelled load since the plant broke down. I finally gave up because I could only argue with a wall for so long.
Replied on Wed, Oct 21, 2015 at 05:13 PM CST
I feel like detention should be graduated. Something like 2 hours free, $30/hr for 2-5 hours, $50/hr for 6-10 hours, and $100/hr after 10. It really does little to replace missed loads but it does help ease it some. Really, I don't mind being flexible but I definitely think that right now the carriers are taking the biggest hit. If shippers/cnees were required to pay detention, my assumption is that the next place wouldn't have so many trucks arriving after they are expected. Can you imagine a world where loads weren't cancelled every other day, detention was paid after 2 hours without fail, and loading/unloading was 24h? lol! Maybe then they could actually justify the rates.
Replied on Wed, Oct 21, 2015 at 10:20 PM CST
+ 1
Originally Posted by: DUSTIN MYERS
Quote: "I feel like detention should be graduated. Something like 2 hours free, $30/hr for 2-5 hours, $50/hr for 6-10 hours, and $100/hr after 10. It really does little to replace missed loads but it does help ease it some. Really, I don't mind being flexible but I definitely think that right now the carriers are taking the biggest hit. If shippers/cnees were required to pay detention, my assumption is that the next place wouldn't have so many trucks arriving after they are expected. Can you imagine a world where loads weren't cancelled every other day, detention was paid after 2 hours without fail, and loading/unloading was 24h? lol! Maybe then they could actually justify the rates."

Dustin once again when you find they are a poop hole then just start jacking the price up.. Good customers get good rates crappy customers get crappy rates. The most powerful word that we have is NO


CRAPPY DISHONEST SHIPPERS/BROKERS/RECEIVERS here you go:

NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

TAKE YOUR CRAPPY RATES and CRAPPY ATTITUDE AND STICK IT WHERE THE SUN DON'T SHINE