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Tri axle hopper

Sep 13, 2016 at 02:35 PM CST
What does everyone haul in a tri axle hopper that falls under the raw or unprocessed ag products. Is there any benefit to running a tri axle vs a tandem?
Replied on Tue, Sep 13, 2016 at 09:34 PM CST
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grain! That's about it. no fertilizer place will load you over 80000. And have fun with the dot. they look for the 6 and 7 axle trucks. one thing isn't right you can get huge fine. I wouldn't go back to hauling over 80000 regardless of the rates. just my opinion
Replied on Wed, Sep 14, 2016 at 09:22 AM CST
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Originally Posted by: DAN EISCHENS
Quote: "grain! That's about it. no fertilizer place will load you over 80000. And have fun with the dot. they look for the 6 and 7 axle trucks. one thing isn't right you can get huge fine. I wouldn't go back to hauling over 80000 regardless of the rates. just my opinion"

That is not exactly true. I have several triple axle trailers that we run long haul on. Granted, most of the hauling we do with them is north and northwest, if you know where the loads are and where you can run that type of trailer, they can be profitable. Again, trucking is not a one size fits all business.
Replied on Wed, Sep 14, 2016 at 10:52 AM CST
im assuming the question was directed at Minnesota with how it was worded. Minnesota you can only haul raw or unfinished agricultural products. And buy permits to do it
Replied on Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 08:59 AM CST
Originally Posted by: DAN EISCHENS
Quote: "im assuming the question was directed at Minnesota with how it was worded. Minnesota you can only haul raw or unfinished agricultural products. And buy permits to do it"

Yes mostly running in Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin. I hauling vegetables all summer with a tri axle end dump, so the permit is already in use for Minnesota.
Replied on Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 02:37 PM CST
if you want to spend your money buying a trailer that you can haul something's at 90 and others at 80 go ahead. Minnesota has this so messed up and use the extra axles as a source of revenue. until Minnesota gets this straighten out i would never waste money on a bigger trailer. figure out your per mile at both weights, the trailer costs, fuel mileage to pull the bigger trailer and you will have your answer about a tri axle
Replied on Thu, Sep 15, 2016 at 09:36 PM CST
Originally Posted by: MARK DEKOK
Quote: "Yes mostly running in Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin. I hauling vegetables all summer with a tri axle end dump, so the permit is already in use for Minnesota."

You still have to abide by bridge laws. The permits are only legal on state funded roads. For county roads and federally funded highways the permits are not valid.

Replied on Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 08:53 AM CST
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Originally Posted by: MARK DEKOK
Quote: "Yes mostly running in Minnesota, Iowa, and Wisconsin. I hauling vegetables all summer with a tri axle end dump, so the permit is already in use for Minnesota."

Didn't intend to start any problems with my post on running triple axles. Just presenting a different point of view.

Replied on Fri, Sep 16, 2016 at 10:37 PM CST
Minnesota has there own special rules for hauling over 80. I've done It and I can't pencil out the extra money if costs to haul more. this is just my opinion. if others think they can make it worth their while more power to them
Replied on Mon, Sep 19, 2016 at 08:41 PM CST
It's all personal performance. And where you wanna run. A triple limits the states you can haul in. I feel a 48 foot spread axel is the best way to go. Because you can load around 25 ton and be 80,000. And around 28 ton and be 85,000 in the states you can run them heavier in. Which with the empty weight of a tri axel you can maybe get 28-30 on anyway
Replied on Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 08:13 AM CST
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Might want to double check but I do not think a 48' spread will bridge at 85500#.... don't wanna stir the pot but when we looked at running spreads this was the dilemma we were looking at. Triples do us very little in Kansas - the added weight (longer trailer and extra axle) just doesn't pencil when only being able to haul 85500. That is where the 10'1" spread 50' long is your best bet for hauling 85500 across KS. Couple problems though..... tire life is terrible and most locations we are going in and out of aren't accomodating to a trailer of 43'. The most efficent trailer in my opinion is a 43'x96x78......if you can find them.
Replied on Thu, Sep 22, 2016 at 09:02 AM CST
if you pencil out the weight of a triple and the weight of a tandem the extra cost of a triple the extra fuel you will burn and the permits it takes to haul over 80 you will find out its not worth hauling the heavy loads expecially in Minnesota. my opinion. but some people have a different pencil and think it's worth it